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Joe - Vocalist Online

Videos with tag Joe
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11:20
11:20
11:20

Songwriting Series - Part One

Andrew Wasson from Creative Guitar Studio begins a three part series covering the analysis of various songwriting ideas used to create a pop/rock song. The example piece was written by Andrew for the instructional series and contains several sections in it's layout. In this video Andrew examines the songs key signature, use of harmony and the layout of harmony through the various sections of the piece. To download a Powertab chart for this video lesson, follow the link below: http://www.creativeguitarstudio.com/lessons/songwriting/songwriting_one.php Official Website: http://www.andrewwasson.com Follow Andrew on Blogspot: http://creativeguitarstudio.blogspot.com/ Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/andrewwasson MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/andrewwasson Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Andrew-Wasson/76585035288

Channels: Songwriting and Production 

Added: 2595 days ago by VOAdmin

Views: 1166 | Comments: 0

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09:05
09:05
09:05

Bass Singers and Low Notes #1

Here's my first bass notes video! The highest note to be found in any of my bass videos will be the E2 (other than those notes included in slides down to notes E2 or lower), or the second E up from the bottom of the standard piano. Thanks to all who allowed me to use their video clips (credits will be in each clip to the person who allowed me to use the clip). Just to let everyone know, there is NO VOCAL FRY IN THIS VIDEO except for some in the very last clip (might be some mixed voice in one other). Friendly comments and questions are welcome (all unfriendly or degrading comments towards these singers or anybody commenting on the video will be deleted). Enjoy this video (and those to come in the future)! :) 1. Adam Lopez does a demonstration of his vocal range. He starts off with a D#2 and proceeds to go 6 octaves higher after that. 2. Josh Turner sings a few D2's in his song, Everything is fine. 3. Basso Profundo Giorgio Tadeo sings and sustains a very nice D2 with no close microphone! 4. Richard Sterban sings a C#2 in the song Jesus is coming soon. This is from their latest 2009 DVD release. 5. Tim Riley slides down to a sustained C2 at the end of Moving up to Gloryland. 6. TV celebrity (who I've heard had some opera training back in the day) Mike Rowe sings a C2 at the end of the Dirty Jobs theme song (I know if you watch the video it looks like Dave Barsky sings the low part at the end, but I read that Mike Rowe recorded all the voice parts himself, so it's really him singing the C2). 7. Now we leave the Great Octave and go into the Contra Octave, starting with a B1 by Josh Turner. The song is Firecracker. 8. Here's Richard Sterban with a very nice slide from A#2-A#1 from the song Where the soul never dies. 9. Aaron McCune, who recently left Gold City and will be missed, is heard here singing an A#1 at the end of Midnight Cry. 10. Here's Aaron again with a few quick but good A1's from the song Get up, Get Ready. 11. Joe Brown, former Bass singer from the Capstone Quartet, sings a few boomy A1's in the song I know what lies ahead. 12. Richard Sterban gets another low one during a very short low passage from I ain't never. He starts at an E2 and ends on an A1. 13. Larry Hooper, the well-known bass from the Lawrence Welk Show, sings an A1-B1-C#2-D2 at the end of Minnie the Mermaid. Very nice! 14. Tim Riley from Gold City hits a few A1's in another performance of Get up, Get Ready. 15. Here's Paul David Kennamer with a very boomy and powerful sustained G#1 at the end of It's almost over. 16. Josh Turner hits his lowest recorded note (so far) while singing King of the Road live with who I believe is Country legend Randy Travis. A very nice G1 at the beginning of the clip from Josh Turner is heard. 17. Aaron McCune sustains a G1 at the end of one of my favorite Gold City songs, For the sake of my heart, here heard being sung live. 18. This is a recent one. As a Gold City veteran, Tim Riley was called in to take Aaron's place after he left until they can find another bass. Always good to hear Tim Riley singing bass with them. Here, he sustains a powerful F#1 at the end of Under Control. New Tenor Chris Cooper is also heard here. 19. You don't think I would dedicate this video to JD Sumner and not have him in it, right? Here's JD with the Masters V in 1991, singing Just a little talk with Jesus. He slides down about 2 octaves at the end, bottoming out at an F1. 20. Here's JD again, this time with the Blackwood Brothers WAY back in the day. This is during the low part of Hide me rock of ages. JD gets all the way down to a sustained E1 here. 21. Paul David Kennamer hits a nice E1 and sustains it in the song Old Ship of Zion. Very nice E1! 22. JD is heard here singing a different version of Just a little talk with Jesus. He bottoms out at an E1 (might touch on D#1 at one point) and finishes the song off by quickly sliding down to a C2. 23. One more from JD. This time, he's with the Masters V from the same 1991 show as the first clip of him in this video. The song is I'm gonna keep on singing, at the end of which JD slides down to a D#1! Very nice! 24. Time for the last note of the Contra Octave! Mike Holcomb from the Inspirations Quartet sings his famous passage live in 1996 during the song Hide me rock of ages. The lowest note is a C1. It seems to be in mixed voice, though if you listen carefully when the rest of the quartet comes in he sounds like he either goes up a note or goes into full chest voice! If that second scenario is true (it sounds like it is, but I'm not entirely sure), this'll be one of few C1's sung in full voice! Excellent! Mike finishes off the song with a nice long sustained C2. 25. One last clip. Here's World Record Holder Tim Storms with the Rescue Quartet, singing an F0(!!!) before quickly sliding up to a B0. Notice the throaty sound and the reduced amount of tone during the F0 and B0...seems to be some vocal fry here.

Channels: Singers Videos 

Added: 2595 days ago by VOAdmin

Views: 5433 | Comments: 0

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02:03
02:03
02:03

Brother Joe May - Short History

Dubbed "The Thunderbolt of the Middle West" by his mentor, the legendary Willie Mae Ford Smith, Brother Joe May was arguably the greatest male soloist in the history of gospel music; a tenor whose dramatic sense of showmanship was surpassed only by his unparalleled command of vocal dynamics and projection, he possessed a voice of unimaginable range and power, moving from a whisper to a scream without the slightest suggestion of effort. May was born in Macon, Mississippi on November 9, 1912; raised in the Church of God denomination -- where all men are called "Brother," hence his stage name -- he began singing at the age of nine, later joining the Little Church Out on the Hills' senior choir. His subsequent tenure as a soloist with the Church of God Quartet solidified his strong reputation throughout the Southern gospel circuit. After graduating high school, May worked as a day laborer in Macon before he and his family relocated to East St. Louis, Illinois in 1941, at which time he hired on at a chemical plant. In the St. Louis area he became a protege of the pioneering Smith, and with her aid honed his sense of phrasing, modeling his own vocal acrobatics on hers; their connection was so strong that May even copied her theatrical performing style. Smith was also the director of the Soloists' Bureau of songwriter Thomas A. Dorsey's National Convention of Gospel Choirs and Choruses, at whose conventions May began to build a name for himself throughout the country; during one such convention in Los Angeles in 1949, he came to the attention of Specialty Records talent scout J.W. Alexander, and upon signing to the label cut his first session later that same year, scoring a major hit with his debut release "Search Me Lord." May's initial success allowed him to quit his day job by 1950, and he began touring the nation, often performing alongside the likes of the Soul Stirrers and the Pilgrim Travelers. With his titanic voice and commanding stage presence, he was often called "the male Mahalia Jackson," a comparison suggested even by Jackson herself. However, despite his popularity -- both "Search Me Lord" and 1950's "Do You Know Him?" were estimated to have sold over one million copies each, making him Specialty's best-selling artist of the period -- May never crossed over to white audiences, the ultimate measure of commerical success at that time. Despite acknowledging Bessie Smith as a major early influence, May also refused to pursue a career as a secular blues singer, and his adamant rejection of all musical traditions but gospel likely played a role in his exit from Specialty in 1958. Now a free agent, May quickly signed with the Nashboro label, where he also began recording many of his own original compositions. As a result of the Nashville-based company's regional focus, the majority of his subsequent live appearances were scheduled across the Deep South, where his fame continued to grow enormously in the years to follow. An extended stretch of the early 1960s also found May starring in the musical Black Nativity in the company of Marion Williams, and after playing Broadway the production toured the U.S. and Europe. After its run was completed, May returned to the South, where his health began to slowly fail; regardless, he maintained his strenuous touring pace, keeping his declining condition a secret even from family members. Finally, while en route to a performance in Thomasville, Georgia, May suffered a massive stroke and died on July 14, 1972 at the age of 60.

Channels: Singers Videos 

Added: 2820 days ago by VOAdmin

Views: 888 | Comments: 0

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